Max Liebermann at Städel

“‘The appeal of the Städel Institute lies in the tremendous energy filling that confined space. Virtually all of the great emotions that have lived in the souls of the peoples of Europe are there, and all in superb works.”
Alfred Lichtwark, Director the Hamburg Museum, 1905

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It is easily noticeable the importance of the Städel Museum in the European context. The famous museum in Frankfurt am Maim has hundreds of very important and beautiful pictures.
In this post I will focus on Max Liebermann, specially in his artwork “Samson and Delilah”
Max Liebermann was a german painter, who was born in Berlin. He was Jewish and studied philosophy and art at the University of Berlin.

He had an enormous collection of French Impressionism due to his inherited wealth. Instead of painting religious motifs, which he may judged petty ones, he was famous by his portraits. He painted famous people, such as Albert Einstein and Paul Von Hindenburg.
The famous Liebermann’s painting we can find at Städel Museum is “Samsom and Delilah”

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Despite being a religious motif, not usual of him, his expression of this biblical scene is very unique and realist, not bounded up with the “Samsom and Delilah” of Rembrant, for instance.
The baroque painting of religious motifs are at no time similar to the impressionist ones
This is the Rembrant’s “Samsom and Delilah”

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Particularly I have a clear preference to Liebermann’s paintings, honestly I am not very fond of baroque artworks. Of course the techniques and proficiency of Rembrant is not to be questioned, I certainly admire his works. But… Different strokes for different folks!

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